Have you (or someone you know) made a decision to stop smoking? Perhaps you realized that second-hand smoke was causing your children’s asthma attacks, or someone close to you died of lung cancer. Maybe it was the cost of cigarettes that became too great a drain on your budget. This article will help you find and choose the best vape mods in the market. There are several factors that you need to consider so you really have to be keen.

Regardless of your motivation, you’ve made the decision to quit. You know it won’t be easy. You’ve seen other people (and possibly yourself) try many times to break their nicotine dependence, without success. You wonder what you can do to help yourself quit long-term. Here are some ideas, supported by medical studies!

First, enlist the support of friends and family. This may be difficult if some of those individuals also smoke. You might explain it to them by pointing out that this is your decision; it might not be the right decision for them. In this way, you can help them realize you are not judging them for continuing to smoke.

Studies have shown that having a smoke-free home is a great way to help yourself. If others in your family smoke, talk to them about eliminating smoking inside the house and confining it to a particular area outside, not too close to a door or window. If smoking is banned at your office or worksite, so much the better. You may have a routine of going outside to smoke with a group of friends at certain times of the day. If this is difficult to give up, talk to your friends about finding other ways to keep in touch. Let them know that you enjoy their company, but your desire to quit smoking is very important to you!

Second, look for a specialized support group for smokers. Although support from friends and family is essential, you also need support from other smokers who are trying to quit. They will better understand what you are experiencing, and can give suggestions on what’s working for them. Nicotine Anonymous is a 12-step program devoted to ending nicotine dependence. Check their website for a meeting near you. Some hospitals also provide support groups, usually as part of a complete program.

If you are not able to find a face-to-face group in your area, there are many message boards/forums that allow those who are quitting to share their experiences, ask questions, and give encouragement.

Third, consider participating in a smoking cessation program. These programs usually last for several weeks and may include education on the effects of smoking, counseling, support groups, motivational activities, and drug therapy. Check your work benefits to find out if your company offers such a program; if not, call your local hospital. Online programs are also available, such as Freedom from Smoking® offered by the American Lung Association.

Fourth, avoid or limit alcohol during the first few weeks of quitting. According to studies reported by Medscape, alcohol was in the bloodstream of about half of smokers who tried to quit but relapsed. Smoking and drinking are often associated, plus alcohol lowers inhibitions, so this finding is not surprising.

Fifth, consider counseling to learn coping skills. For example, what should you do when you must be around other smokers? How can you improve the negative moods that result when you quit? A few sessions with a counselor experienced in helping smokers quit will give you the information you need.

Finally, what about medications, such as Zyban, or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)? Talk with your personal physician about your need for these drugs. If you are pregnant or nursing, or have certain medical problems such as kidney disease, you should attempt to quit without medication. Your doctor may suggest NRT in the form of lozenges, gum, nasal spray, or a nicotine patch. In this way nicotine withdrawal can be more gradual than going “cold turkey.” Zyban is an antidepressant which will improve your mood and help reduce cravings. It also helps reduce the weight gain that smokers dread. Another drug, Chantix, has been approved by the FDA and is considered a first-line treatment for smoking cessation. A review of nine different studies comparing it to Zyban indicated that smokers taking Chantix were three times more likely to quit successfully (i.e. for at least 12 weeks) than those taking an antidepressant.

As you can see, there is much more to quitting smoking than simply chewing nicotine gum or taking a pill. Behavioral changes, which are part of your personal power, are equally important, if not more so. I hope that you will consider making these changes, and I wish you luck in your endeavor!

Chris
Author

Chris Harrison is a content writer and editor from New Caledonia. He is currently managing Oneunionone which is based in North Carolino. Before founding the website, he was a full time editor in New York USA.